The Third Component of Great Sex: Deep Sexual and Erotic Intimacy

What's the difference between "connection" (number two of the "eight components of optimal sexuality") and "deep sexual and erotic intimacy" (number three)? That stumped me for a bit while I was digesting the study published last year in The Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality.

Then I read this quote from one of the study’s participants, describing a type of intimacy that goes beyond intense connection in the moment: “It’s part of the way you act with each other long before you’re actually engaged in any kind of, you know, technical sex.”

I like that. I think that “the way you act with each other” before, after, and during “technical sex” is essential to deep erotic and emotional intimacy. Trust, respect, and real admiration and acceptance build the foundation for a truly intimate relationship. These are things that take time, that come with knowing each other in a profound way.

And, in my experience, you can tell if a couple has this kind of intimacy just by observing the way they interact at the grocery store or a dinner party. Do they laugh at each other’s jokes? Do they exchange quick touches and knowing glances? Do they refrain from criticizing each others’ tastes in breakfast cereal?

According to study participants, a deep sense of caring for one’s partner is a key characteristic of sexual intimacy. One woman mentioned that her need to feel solicitude and concern had become more important to her with age: “I don’t know that I’m capable of having great sex anymore without really caring about a partner.”

The study’s authors noted that “almost every participant identified a deep and penetrating sense of trust as characteristic of the intimacy that was part of great sex for them.” They needed to trust that their partners cared for them and that the relationship was secure.

This kind of trust and intimacy doesn’t just happen. It takes time and openness and communication. Especially at midlife, when our bodies and needs are changing, it’s important for partners to talk with each other, to stay up-to-date on feelings and desires. Honest and caring talk about sex can be erotic in itself, and can go a long way toward creating and maintaining the deep intimacy that makes for sex that is “better than good.”

More on this next week, when we look at component number four: Extraordinary Communication!


2 Responses

sicircae
sicircae

July 06, 2015

“This is especially true for menopausal women, but can also be a complaint for young women and mothers. When questioned closely about their relationship with their partners, it becomes clear there is little time spent together feeding their relationship.”
Are you sure that this is true?

Anne Vaillancourt
Anne Vaillancourt

July 06, 2015

All to often in the clinic where I work, women will complain to me about their lack of sex drive. This is especially true for menopausal women, but can also be a complaint for young women and mothers. When questioned closely about their relationship with their partners, it becomes clear there is little time spent together feeding their relationship.

I agree totally with your post. For women, the secret to great sex is a great relationship outside of the bedroom.

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