March 08, 2018

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diet ›   exercise ›   menopause ›   sleep ›   stress ›  


Sleep! We’re in Favor.

If you’re wearing a Fitbit to bed, like a patient I saw last week, you might be seeing pretty colored charts that confirm just exactly how poorly you slept last night. And if you’re like her, it may only be increasing your stress about what you already know: You’re tired! You’d like to sleep through the night!

Yes, as you’re likely tired of hearing, it’s hormones. Estrogen and progesterone are in decline, and the mix of hormones (add cortisol, the “stress hormone” to the cocktail, too) may be less friendly to sleep than it once was. Hot flashes, which can happen day or night, come with a surge of adrenaline, from which you need to recover before you can settle back to sleep.

What you're thinking of in the middle of the night is spam. Delete it!A few of the people I’ve talked to for The Fullness of Midlife, our podcast, have had some light to shed on our sleeplessness. Joan Vernikos, a retired NASA health science researcher, says sleep is “like a cleaning service in an office. ...The cleaning service starts out by emptying the garbage cans, by tidying up, picking up—and that’s what happens with the brain during sleep in the various cycles. If you wake up and you don’t sleep well, not only are you going to make mistakes the next day, but you’re not going to detox your brain.”

Menopause can sometimes bring its own befuddlement, right? Memory lapses. Foggy thinking. Well, add in some sleep deprivation and a brain in desperate need of a “detox,” and you can imagine a day that you’d rather forget.

Another podcast guest, Dr. Pamela Peeke, gave us a pep talk about making “sleep hygiene” a priority. She points out the relationship between sleep and diet: We’re much better able to be in control of our appetite—not because we lack self-discipline but because of busy hormones at work in our bodies—when we’re well-rested.

Make “sleep hygiene” a priority? Well, it sounds good. And there’s plenty of reason to do it, from easier healthy eating to clear-headed days. Here’s what it takes:

  • Make your bedroom comfortable for sleep. Is it dark enough? Cool enough? You might want to layer your bedding like you layer your outerwear for a hike on an early spring day—so both you and your partner can be comfortable throughout the night. Consider white noise if sounds are keeping you awake. If now is not the time to invest in your good sleep, when is?
  • Exercise. To patients in my office, I recommend 45 minutes five days a week of real exercise—walking, swimming, biking. Something that gets the heart-rate up. If some part of that can be outdoors, even better, because natural light helps us with our sleep-wake cycles. Get it in early, so you can avoid exercise in the three hours just before bedtime.
  • Stay awake during the day. I know it’s tempting to nap when you’re not sleeping well at night. But napping for more than 20 to 30 minutes can make it more difficult to sleep deeply overnight, which is when that brain detoxing Joan talked about happens.
  • Ease away from stimulants and heavy foods. The effect of caffeine can change as our bodies change. And the relaxing effect of alcohol wakes us up later when we’re metabolizing it. Digesting heavy foods can do the same.
  • De-stress generally, but especially as part of a pre-bed routine. Excess stress is a health challenge for us at any age. While it’s unlikely you can eliminate stress from your life, you can at least develop some routines for putting it in its place before you turn in for the night. Set a routine—yoga for relaxation, reading a novel, writing in a gratitude journal, taking a hot bath—that signals that it’s time to settle down. Avoid screens in the hour before bed, especially contentious text or Facebook exchanges or upsetting documentaries. And remember what Joan said when you’re churning at night: “What you’re thinking of in the middle of the night is spam. Delete it! You can’t do anything about it.”

A perhaps unexpected side effect? Since stress and fatigue are two of the three most common obstacles to sex (the third is lack of privacy), you just might find yourself with a little more romance in your life.

Makes “sleep hygiene” sound a little sexy.

February 19, 2018

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hot flashes ›   menopause ›  


Normalizing Menopause in the Workplace

For our mothers, pregnancy was the workplace unmentionable. Once a married woman began to “show,” she was expected to leave her job and begin her new life as a stay-at-home wife and mother. Now, our daughters often have family leave time, breastfeeding rooms at work, sometimes even on-site daycare.  

Still, we have a long way to go. Despite progress on many fronts, menopause remains the workplace unmentionable. It makes people uncomfortable. It can be embarrassing; it isn’t well-understood; it is the butt of stereotypes and jokes; it is inevitably linked to being old, infertile and irrational. Heck, too often, we don’t even understand it ourselves.

In the workplace, the universal approach to menopause seems to be “don’t ask; don’t tell.” If you can’t see it, it ain’t happening.

There are, however, a few problems with this approach.

In our mother’s time, women over 50 were a rarity in the workplace. Our mothers didn’t talk about menopause. They didn’t discuss it with their doctors, spouses, or with us, by and large. There weren’t many options for treatment, anyway.

Now, however, while menopause is still in the closet, a lot of valuable employees at the peak of their careers are going through it. Now, most (75 to 80 percent) of women of menopausal age are working. If menopausal symptoms affect job performance and satisfaction, and if many of these problems could be addressed with more flexible policies and a supportive environment, then why isn’t it happening? Why are so many women struggling through the workday when fairly simple solutions could be implemented?

Menopause is prolonged and unpredictable. There is no handbook; it isn’t over in nine months—it can, in fact, last anywhere from four to eight years! Some women sail through without missing a beat while others struggle mightily with emotional swings, sleep issues, brutal hot flashes and night sweats, and a severe hit to self-confidence. Most of us fall somewhere in the middle, and most of us would appreciate a little understanding on the job.

Because we are numerous and at the peak of our career, one would think that accommodation, or at least conversation, would be happening in the workplace. But alas, in the US we are far behind our Western counterparts overseas. In Europe, awareness may be in its infancy, but at least it’s on the radar.

A lot of people are afraid to say what they want.For example, a poll of just over 1,000 women between 50 and 60 conducted by BBC Radio in Great Britain found that over 70 percent of women didn’t discuss their menopausal symptoms with their employer and about 33 percent hadn’t talked about it with their doctor, either. Half of the women surveyed said that menopausal symptoms had affected their mental health and one-quarter said that it made them want to stay home.

"It was such a waste of all that talent and experience that these women had in serving the public,” said Sue Fish, the former police chief who established the force’s first menopause policies in this article. "I was horrified to find out women were leaving early because of the severity of their symptoms. Some had been rebuffed by line managers or they'd chosen not to talk about what they were going through.”

It’s a touchy issue, to be sure. Most of us wouldn’t want to be singled out for special treatment, and most of our colleagues and bosses wouldn’t want to draw attention to our difficulty or make suggestions about fixing it. Yet, competent, productive women still struggle through work situations that could be made bearable with some awareness and a few, simple adjustments.

A web entrepreneur says in this article, “I have friends in senior roles who have had to attend meetings with closed windows where they were almost expiring from heat and drenched in perspiration, fearing that wet patches might appear – but this does not prevent them from continuing to work effectively.”

So, what’s the balance, and how do we begin to move the needle so our daughters don’t have to sweat it out (pun intended) in an oblivious workplace?

The Faculty of Occupational Medicine (FOM), the educational body of the Royal College of Physicians in the UK, has put together some fairly commonsensical suggestions in its “Guidance on Menopause in the Workplace” that were adapted from the European Menopause and Andropause Society.

The guidelines are addressed to both employers and to menopausal-aged female employees, since both sides share ownership of a solution. Guidance for employers emphasizes an atmosphere of openness and dialog, along with training for management. It also suggests that employers provide some access to ventilation and temperature control, some flexibility in work hours, choice in types of fabrics and the ability to layer clothing when a uniform is required, and some ability to move around for sedentary workers.

Menopausal employees are encouraged to learn about this transition and to reach out to their doctors for help and information, to develop techniques, such as note-taking and using a calendar, to compensate for memory lapses, to reach out to colleagues, sympathetic managers and HR personnel for help and camaraderie when possible rather than trying to suffer in silence. The guidelines also suggest using mindfulness techniques to reduce stress and to consider lifestyle changes that are known to ease symptoms: weight loss, not smoking, reducing alcohol use, and exercise.

Working toward a workplace that is accepting and open to menopause is a worthy goal, and now, given our numbers, is an opportune time to crack that resistance. We did it before, and for our daughters’ sake, we can to do it again.

December 28, 2017

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community ›   gratitude ›   menopause ›  


2017. It's a Wrap!

Life moves fast. That’s a truism for everyone, but this tumultuous year, time seems to have whizzed by on steroids. Still, I don’t want to tumble into 2018 (yikes!) without one last glance over my shoulder at the year that was.  

Maybe my glass is half-full, but one word that comes to mind in describing the practitioner side is “innovation”—an unusual flurry of it. New treatments for menopausal symptoms, such as Intrarosa, have recently been introduced; it looks like Addyi may have new energy behind it; and new products, such as the women-designed vibrators from Dame, have come to market. I’d like to believe that this problem-solving innovation is a result of our many voices expecting answers along with a growing social awareness of both the normality and challenges of menopause.

“Community” is another word that comes to mind as I think about 2017. Not one, but many communities of women (and men) who are passionate about de-stigmatizing menopause, making it a normal, even exciting, transition to a different, yet still fulfilling life, and to keeping love and sexuality squarely in the middle of it. These include professionals like Dr. Pam, whose documentary we recently mentioned, and Mary Jo Rapini, just one of many colleagues whose work is all about living mindfully and abundantly.

I’m also thinking of online communities, like RedHotMamas—and this blog as well—that create an entertaining, informative space to address all things menopause. Here’s a list of the Top 50 menopause blogs from Feedspot. (Spoiler: We’re number 3!)

A natural outgrowth of our MiddlesexMD community is our new podcast, The Fullness of Midlife. In this series of interviews, we explore diverse stories, perceptions, and insights with the women (and men) who cross our path. Check it out! You’ll be entertained and inspired.

Then, of course, there’s you—the community of MiddlesexMD women who share your stories with me personally or on this blog. Who write to ask about our products. Who listen to our podcasts. You are the reason and motivation for everything we do here at MiddlesexMD. I am gratified and humbled every day by your trust, your stories, and your spirit.

So here’s to another year of opportunity, fulfillment, meaning, and challenge. 

December 21, 2017

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intimacy ›   menopause ›   sex after menopause ›  


Holiday Entertainment: “Love, Sweat, and Tears,” a Documentary about Menopause

Here’s an idea to spice up a holiday evening: Gather your coffee klatch girlfriends, or your BFFs, or even your sisters and/or daughters, make popcorn and margaritas, and watch “Love, Sweat, and Tears,” the new documentary about menopause.

Even better, snuggle up and watch it with your partner, because the red thread running through all the information about hot flashes and mood swings is that our sex lives don’t have to be disrupted or put on the shelf forever because of menopause. We can still be sexual beings; we can still be attractive; we darned well can still have sex.

Sound familiar?

The movie was a labor of love for Dr. Pam Gaudry, an ob/gyn who specializes in treating older women. After years of consulting with patients in the throes of menopause, Dr. Pam came to realize that of all the difficulties accompanying menopause, the most disturbing to many of her patients was the disruption of their sex lives. Losing this deep and intimate connection with loved partners was the most distressing part of menopause. And she knew that losing sexual intimacy is completely unnecessary.

Dr. Pam wants to educate women about menopause, about how to stay vital, healthy, and sexually fulfilled. She wants to blow up the social stigma surrounding menopause (that we’re dried-up old crones). “Women should look forward to this transition,” she says. “I want them to know what to do to protect their vaginas so they can have exciting, comfortable, and worry free sexual intercourse for the rest of their lives.”

In the film, Dr. Pam travels across America interviewing actors, comedians, clergy, medical professionals, as well as ordinary men and women about love and menopause. Joan Rivers is the headliner, in what turned out to be her last interview before her death in 2014. “I’m on a mission,” says Dr. Pam in her interview with Rivers, “to save menopausal vaginas in America.”

“Well, sign me up,” says Rivers.

In the course of the film, Dr. Pam interviews several colleagues that MiddlesexMD readers have met—Mary Jo Rapini and Dr. Michael Krychman. I make a cameo appearance, too.

Basically, Dr. Pam covers the same ground that we do here at MiddlesexMD because we have the same mission and message. She does it holistically, with humor and a lot of sage advice. “I want women to know why they must protect their vaginas,” she says. “I want estrogen in their vaginas when they’re going into the ground. And no woman should die without using a vibrator.”

You can rent the movie on YouTube, Netflix, or Amazon. (Run time about an hour and twenty minutes)

Do not hesitate to gather selected friends and family and watch this movie together. For you and your honey, it’s required viewing. A pop quiz will follow.

 

 

Sex and Your Hysterectomy: Getting Sexy Back

Recently, we’ve been discussing the reasons to have (or not to have) a hysterectomy and the various surgical options—all very important information to have before you decide to have the procedure.

Now let’s talk about what happens after the surgery. Specifically, what might happen to your sex life.

Usually, your doctor will tell you to wait about four to six weeks before having sex, depending on the type of procedure you had. You might want to clarify with your doctor exactly what he or she means by “sex.” Usually, that means vaginal penetration. So ask if oral sex is okay. How about using a vibrator or a hand?

When you’re ready for intercourse, you’ll want to start gently—lots of lube and gentle penetration. If the cervix was removed, it may take time for the top of the vagina (the “vaginal cuff”) to heal. Penetration may feel differently for a while. (Here’s a good metaphor for the process.)   

Sometimes, emotional healing has to happen as well. After all, hysterectomy is the surgical end to childbearing. For some, depending on the reason for the hysterectomy, this is a relief; for others, it’s a significant and sometimes difficult transition. If you are overwhelmed by emotion or even depression, give yourself some time and space to heal. You may also need to seek out a listening ear or professional counselor to regain balance.

If your ovaries were removed, and you haven’t yet gone through menopause, or even if you’re in perimenopause, be prepared for the possibility of significant emotional and physical change. With the removal of your ovaries, hormone production suddenly stops, and you’re now in surgically induced menopause. This requires some preparation ahead of time and some patience and therapy after the procedure.

The good news is that, for most women, sex tends to be unchanged and is sometimes better. The parts necessary for orgasm are still intact, and the issues that may have caused the trouble in the first place (pain or bleeding) are gone. “Most women tell me that there is no change in the way they feel orgasm, and they are able to enjoy sex more since they don't have their original problem to interfere with sex,” writes Dr. Paul Indman in this article.

This opinion is supported by several studies confirming that, for most women, sex is the same or better after a hysterectomy. In a small study of 104 women, researchers determined that the best predictor of the quality of sex after a hysterectomy was the quality of sex before the procedure.

Despite the research, some women say that sex just isn’t the same. They report weaker orgasms and less sensation, loss of libido, and difficulty with arousal. Therapies can help—hormone replacement, localized estrogen, lubes and moisturizers—but they can’t replace nature.

Furthermore, although the vast majority of women recover well, a hysterectomy is still a surgical procedure with all the attendant risks and uncertainties. Unexpected outcomes happen—nerves may be damaged; prolapse or fistula may occur. The long-term effect of removing significant abdominal organs is still poorly understood.

With that in mind, some tips for approaching this, or any, surgery might be:

  • Try the most conservative treatments first. Fibroids, heavy bleeding, endometriosis can be treated with less invasive methods. Start there. A hysterectomy isn’t the first line of defense.
  • Opt for the most conservative surgery. If a hysterectomy is the best choice, make sure you understand your options. The least invasive surgical options (vaginal or laparoscopic) simply have better outcomes. If there’s no good reason to remove your ovaries, ask about keeping them.
  • Do your homework and line up your resources. Make sure you and your partner understand what’s happening and be prepared for a time of adjustment afterward.

Several years ago, an acquaintance had a total hysterectomy that included the removal of her ovaries. She was post-menopausal at the time, but sex was still very important to her and her husband. She was worried about the effect her hysterectomy would have on their sex life and discussed it with her doctor.

Recently she told me that there had indeed been a period of transition after her hysterectomy, but that over time, she had regained her former sensation, including the deep, pleasurable orgasms she had been accustomed to.

“I don’t know how it happened,” she told me. “I just worked from the memory of what sex had been before my surgery and focused on regaining that. And I did.”

Everyone’s experience is unique. It’s impossible to predict with utter certainty how an individual will respond to any surgical procedure. With a good medical team, good information, and a supportive partner, you’ve tilted the odds strongly in your favor.

 

Sex and Your Hysterectomy: A Primer

I’m just gonna say it: the best time to get information about sex after a hysterectomy is before the hysterectomy ever happens.

When a patient come to me with sexual issues after having had a hysterectomy, and she is unclear about what kind of hysterectomy she actually received—what organs were removed or whether she had a laparoscopic or a vaginal procedure, for example—this indicates to me that she may not have sought or received the information she needed in order to make an informed decision.

Whether to have a hysterectomy is a loaded topic these days, so let’s just dive in and get the facts out of the way, shall we?

Hysterectomy is the second most common surgical procedure performed on women after caesarian section.  Almost 12 percent of women between 40 and 44 have had one. That number rises to 30 percent by the time you’re 60. About 600,000 procedures are performed every year in the US—the highest rate in the world, although other developed countries also do a lot of hysterectomies.

Most hysterectomies are performed for such benign but bothersome conditions as fibroid growths, endometriosis, heavy bleeding, and vaginal prolapse. Only about 10 percent are done for truly life-threatening conditions such as cancer or a uterine rupture during childbirth.

It’s almost like having a hysterectomy has become a normalized part of growing older as a woman. You get your hair colored, and you have a hysterectomy. That’s just how it goes.

Recently, however, women’s health organizations and other health professionals—as well as women themselves—have been questioning that inevitability and pushing for less radical treatments for benign conditions. These include less invasive treatments, such as having a progestin IUD placed or endometrial ablation for heavy bleeding or uterine artery embolectomy treatments for fibroids. Still, hysterectomy remains the most common go-to for a host of “female troubles.”

Like any surgical procedure, a hysterectomy involves weighing risks and benefits. These are dependent on factors such as age, childbirth history, the size and shape of the uterus, among other considerations.

For example, it might be better for a younger woman with a benign and treatable condition to first try the alternatives to the permanent removal of her uterus because her reproductive organs are still fertile and hormone-producing. Even a woman in perimenopause is still producing hormones with all their good protective benefits to vaginal tissue, heart, and bone.

A post-menopausal woman with an unpleasant uterine prolapse, on the other hand, might be a very good candidate for hysterectomy. This patient’s hormone production has virtually ended and other treatment options aren’t permanent or also involve a surgical procedure.

Sometimes, however, when a woman’s quality of life is so compromised, when she’s in enough pain or bleeding so erratically or profusely, she may be willing to do anything to make it stop. A hysterectomy will make it stop and will often improve both sex and quality of life. But a frank patient/doctor discussion is still critical—so she understands her options and, insofar as possible, what the outcome will be.

So—there are options for treatments of benign conditions such as fibroids or endometriosis. Hysterectomy is invasive and permanent, so it makes sense to explore other options first. But if a hysterectomy seems to be the best approach, you then need to know about the different types of hysterectomy and their outcomes.

This is important, ladies, because how quickly you recover and the effect on your sex life has everything to do with the type of surgery you have and what organs are removed.  

We’ll discuss this in a post next week.

Q: Will vitamins be effective for hot flashes and other symptoms?

You mention joint pain, weight gain, and food cravings in addition to hot flashes as symptoms of menopause. Menopause has such a variety of symptoms, depending on each individual. Lifestyle matters more; exercise is more important; adequate sleep and good nutrition—all of these have a greater impact to quality of life now than they did previously.

I wish I could tell you there is good data suggesting vitamins have a favorable impact on menopausal symptoms, but the trials looking at the specific supplements you mention and others suggest no benefit greater than placebo. But, hey, placebo has about a 30-percent response rate in any trial, so there is certainly no harm in using them. They provide some general vitamins that will not be harmful, and may help if you aren’t getting them in your diet.

The symptoms you mention could all potentially benefit from hormone therapy (HT). The loss of estrogen is huge for most women, and the loss of progesterone to some extent as well. For many women the only way to address symptoms adequately is to consider HT. More and more data suggests that HT is beneficial for women specifically with weight gain; that was a lead article in one of my journals just this week.

It’s a complicated journey that is nuanced, and each woman needs to assess her own symptoms and goals and determine the best approach to managing through menopause. It’s difficult to address all of the treatment options in a single Q&A. You might find the North American Menopause Society (NAMS) website helpful: menopause.org. They cover many issues related to menopause.

Good luck!

 

Menopausal Weight Gain: Fighting Back with Exercise

In previous posts, we discussed why menopausal weight gain is such a game-changer, and we explored how to limit the damage through dietary changes. Now, we’ll talk about the second critical key for maintaining—or regaining—a healthy weight after menopause.

You know what I’m gonna say.

Exercise. Not only does a regular exercise regimen help you burn more calories, which is what weight loss is all about, but it can also give you a higher quality of life and actually stave off illness.

Longitudinal studies have found that people who are more fit at midlife have lower levels of chronic illnesses, such as heart failure, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, colon and lung cancers, as they age. Although other factors, such as heredity, play a role, in general, higher fitness levels were strongly linked with lower rates of major chronic illnesses. “Compression of morbidity” is when debilitating illness doesn’t happen until close to the end of life—and people with healthy, active lifestyles tend to have compression of morbidity.  

How’s that for paybacks?

I can tell you from personal experience that a regular, moderately challenging exercise regimen relieves stress, helps you sleep better, reduces the “aches and pains” associated with aging, and helps you to keep up with normal activities of daily life. It regulates your bowels and your moods. And simply feeling stronger and more capable physically helps you to feel more capable and in control of your life generally.

However, I will also say that maintaining a serious (and by serious, I mean regular and moderately challenging) exercise regimen is not easy. It takes time and self-discipline. It makes you sweat. It makes you breathless and it might make you sore.

Not only that, you have to approach exercise differently in your golden years than you did before. You won’t be able to just take off running without a serious warm up; you’ll have to watch your form more carefully; you’ll want to opt for low-impact exercise. Your postmenopausal exercise regimen should contain four elements:

  • Cardio. This is the aerobic stuff that gets your heart rate up, like walking fast enough that you can talk, but not sing (about 3.5 mph, which I find I can do with practice and conditioning), biking, swimming, dancing. Unless you know your joints can take it, stick with low-impact aerobics. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends two-and-a-half hours of moderately strenuous aerobic exercise per week.

Lately, high intensity interval training (HIIT) is recommended to increase the effectiveness of an aerobic workout. In this regimen you alternate bursts of higher activity, such as jogging, with a less active period, such as walking. This gives you an “afterburner” effect in which your muscles continue to burn oxygen after the period of high activity. This AARP article has a good explanation of the benefits of HIIT.

  • Strength (resistance) training. This helps you maintain muscle strength. (Remember that you lose at least 20 percent of muscle mass as you age.) You can use weights or resistance bands, body weight or exercise machines. The CDC recommends weight training 2 days per week.
  • Flexibility. Stretching and toning exercises maintain your range-of-motion and keep your tendons healthy and your joints juicy. Don’t bounce or jerk while stretching. Hold positions for at least 30 seconds and don’t stretch to the point of pain. It’s a good practice to stretch after your regular workout. Here’s a simple stretching routine from the Mayo Clinic. Yoga is fabulous for maintaining flexibility and relieving stress. (Listen to our podcast on this topic here.) It also counts as strength training, so consider joining a class once or twice a week.
  • Balance. Balance is another capacity that diminishes with age, but it’s important to maintain because injury from falls is common and serious. Tai chi is a great discipline to improve balance, but so are simple exercises, such as standing on one foot, unassisted, for 10 seconds or standing first on tiptoe and then heels—simple exercises you can do every day.

Arguably, the hardest part about exercise is getting started. If you have any health conditions that might limit your activity, such as high blood pressure or arthritis, you need to talk with your doctor about what exercises you should and shouldn’t do.

Ideally, you should find a gym with classes or a trainer to get you started—to make sure you’re using correct form, and to show you how to use the machines. Yoga or Tai chi classes with experienced teachers are fantastic and motivational for establishing an exercise regimen.

Get on your mat every day.If this isn’t practical or possible for you, you might turn to the internet for videos and programs. You want substance, knowledgeable leaders, and safety, not razzle-dazzle. Try Fitness Blender (free workout videos and programs for all levels of fitness), Daily Burn, ($15/month; variety of workouts, including yoga, tailored to age and fitness level) or Yoga Today ($15/month with a discount for yearly membership; many workouts tailored to fitness level).

The next hardest part of an exercise regimen is continuing. You will miss days; you will have days in which you don’t work as hard as you should. After a few missed sessions, starting again is hard. That’s just how it goes. You start over; you don’t quit.

Part of the battle is finding a program that works for you—one that is varied, challenging (you are progressively lifting heavier, going longer and faster), but that isn’t killing you. Soreness is good; pain is bad. Move carefully without overextending or snapping joints. Always warm up and cool down.

This is your new normal: a clean diet, a daily exercise regimen that alternates weight training and aerobic exercise and incorporates stretching and balance segments.

I promise you that every ounce of effort invested in a healthy diet and regular exercise will return to you many-fold in a much higher quality of life now and in lower risk of chronic illness down the road. Let me know how it goes and send me any questions you may have. This stuff is too important to overlook.  

Fight Menopausal Weight Gain: Your Diet

During menopause, weight is easy to gain (in fact, some weight gain is almost inevitable) and hard to lose, for all the reasons we mentioned in the last post: metabolic change, loss of muscle mass, hormonal change, sleep deprivation, and stress.

So, ladies, if you’re just entering menopause—heads up! Game-changer ahead! Women who enter menopause close to their ideal weight have a better chance of maintaining it; however, women who tend to yo-yo or who have a hard time maintaining a healthy weight will tend to end up at the high end of their weight range.

Don't eat anything your great-great grandmother would not recognize as food.Whatever you did in your 30s to keep your weight in check isn’t going to work anymore. You’ve lost about 20 percent of your muscle mass and you need about 200 fewer calories per day you enter your 50s and 60s. Forewarned is forearmed, as they say. Simply recognizing this fact may help you step away from the hamster wheel of yore and toward a regimen that actually works.

The good news is that the best weight management strategy—the one that will work for the long haul—will also keep you stronger, more flexible, healthier, and capable of maintaining an active lifestyle for far longer. You’ll be able to travel, garden, play with the grandkids, get up off the floor, carry heavier loads, and remain generally pain-free.

The bad news is that it’s hard. A realistic and effective strategy to maintain a healthy weight requires self-discipline and lifestyle change. For the rest of your life. As you’ve probably guessed, you have to get serious about exercise and your diet—how much and what kind of food you put in your mouth.

Sure, you can go on a killer diet; you can take medications that will help you lose weight. But you probably already know the drill here—without lifestyle change, you’ll put it right back on and then some. Only now, you’re much more vulnerable to a host of serious, life-altering ailments, such as joint problems, diabetes, and cardiovascular trouble.  

So let’s talk about ways of eating that work for older women. We’re not talking about draconian measures that you’ll have a hard time maintaining. In fact, overly rigorous dieting can actually cause you to lose muscle mass and slow your metabolism even more, which is the last thing you need right now.

  • Focus on fresh, real, homemade food. You need to consume fewer calories, but they need to be high-quality, nutritious calories. Think whole grains, fresh fruit and vegetables, nuts, and legumes. Don’t go crazy on low- and non-fat foods, which are unhealthy in hidden ways. Instead, go for the unsaturated fats in olive or sesame oils, avocados, nuts, and salmon or tuna. “…[nutrient-rich, unsaturated fat] keeps your skin supple and your body from drying out. Basically, it’s like putting lotion on your body but from the inside out,” says Dr. Christine Gerbstadt in this article.  
  • Speaking of calories: A sedentary older woman in her 50s and 60s should consume about 1600 calories per day. If you’re more active, bump that up to 1800 calories. To lose one pound per week, you need a daily 500-calorie deficit, either through diet or exercise. I’m thinking it’s better not to gain that weight in the first place.  
  • Protein is important to replace muscle and protect bones—5 to 6 ounces of lean protein per day, such as that in dairy products, poultry, and fish.
  • The best diets for older women are the Mediterranean diet and the low-carb diet. Vegan and vegetarian diets are also good for weight loss and have been linked to greater longevity.
  • In the beginning, a structured meal plan is helpful. Write down what you’ll eat in the morning, so you don’t find yourself peckish in the mid-afternoon and absentmindedly reaching for the cookies. Later, you can mentally plan your daily menus. Try to establish a regular pattern, so you get used to eating at about the same time each day.
  • Avoid sugar, but don’t be obsessive about it. If you’re too rigorous, you may just be setting yourself up for a binge. An occasional treat is a nod to mental health.
  • Alcohol (even in red wine) is not your friend. Alcoholic drinks are full of sugar and high in calories. One 4-oz. (half-cup) wine or beer per day is the limit. 1.5 oz. for spirits.
  • If you slip up, it’s not the end of the world. Start fresh the next day. Just don’t give up.
  • Bariatric surgery is a highly risky last-resort. But it does work, and may be less risky than years of obesity,
  • Oh, and drink plenty of water.

“My body has changed, so I’ve got to change with it. I can’t do what I did 20 years ago and expect to stay slim,” says nutritionist and co-author of The Full Plate Diet Dr. Diana Fleming in this article.

Staying fit and trim after menopause is no picnic, but feeling healthy, capable, and in control of your life is worth every uneaten ounce of chocolate.

 

 

Weight Gain: Dirty Menopausal Trick

As if the hot flashes, mood swings, night sweats, and sexual challenges weren’t enough, now you can add weight gain to the menopausal whammy.  

That’s right. In case you hadn’t noticed (fat chance!), women tend to gain about 10-15 pounds on average—from 3 to 30 pounds is the typical range—during and after menopause. And because our entire metabolic mechanism is different now, that weight is blessedly hard to take off.

“I feel like my body has betrayed me,” said one of my patients.

“Prior to menopause I was able to maintain a weight loss of 70 pounds. I see that 25 pounds have come back and nothing I seem to do is helping,” said another woman.

Weight gain during menopause isn’t totally related to “the change.” Lifestyle, genetics, and, yes, hormonal fluctuation all play their respective roles, for better or for worse. But the weight goes on, and the way that happens is different from weight gain in previous years.

So, if you’re accustomed to losing weight easily—or not gaining it in the first place—this development may come as a puzzling and unpleasant surprise. And if you struggle with your weight, be forewarned: The deck is about to be reshuffled, and that struggle may become harder yet. The single bright spot is that you’re in a very big boat with a lot of other menopausal gals—up to 90 percent of us gain weight during this transition, according to this article.

Menopausal weight gain is different because:

  • It’s slow and steady—one or two pounds per year. Not enough to really notice, but the cumulative effect sneaks up on you.
  • It accumulates attractively around the abdomen. Belly fat. The kind that’s linked to heart disease and diabetes.
  • Breasts are bigger and the back is fattier. This might be nice for those of us who’ve always been lacking in that department, except that now, accompanied by a slowly enlarging belly, not to mention the back fat, the overall effect is less than flattering to our contemporary visions. And for those who were always well-endowed, well, a little (or a lot) more may simply be overkill.
  • It’s hard to lose. While “hard to lose” is a functional definition of weight gain, this is different because it’s part and parcel of a more profound change in how your body processes energy.
  • Body shape changes. Previously, you may have been a string bean or a curvaceous plum. Now you’re a round apple.

In order to effectively tackle this unsettling turn of events and to grasp why the things you did before aren’t working now, it helps to understand the underlying mechanism.

For one thing, muscle mass, which is an efficient burner of calories, slowly decreases with age. Now, even your resting metabolism (when you aren’t active) is lower. Adding insult to injury, loss of estrogen compounds this effect. Studies of lab animals suggest that estrogen has a regulating effect on appetite and weight gain. Animals with lower estrogen levels ate more and moved less.

When the ovaries stop producing estrogen, fat cells tend to take over. Ovaries produce estradiol, a “premium” estrogen; fat cells produce estrone, which is a weak, inefficient estrogen. This hormonal change increases the body’s efficiency at depositing fat, especially, we find, around the abdomen.

What used to work in the past may not now.A recent study confirmed that certain proteins and enzymes that enable cells to store more fat and to burn it less become more active in post-menopausal women. “Taken together, these changes in bodily processes may be more than a little surprising—and upsetting—for women who previously had little trouble managing their weight,” comments Sylvia Santosa, assistant professor in Concordia University’s Department of Exercise Science in this article.

You got that right, sister.

Menopause packs a couple more weight-inducing changes: insomnia and stress. When you don’t sleep well (and who does, what with night sweats and cratering mood swings?), levels of ghrelin, known as the “hunger hormone,” rise and levels of the “fullness hormone” leptin drop. That’s why you get the nighttime munchies. A study of over 1,000 volunteers (The Wisconsin Sleep Cohort Study) found that those who slept less had higher ghrelin levels and lower leptin levels—and also had a higher body mass index (BMI), i.e. they weighed more.

And we all know what stress eating does to our waistline.

So, what’s a stressed-out, sleep-deprived, menopausal woman to do? It’s a challenge, without doubt. However, when we understand the mechanism—what’s happening to our bodies on a biological level—then we realize that doing what we did before isn’t going to work. We need to change up the paradigm if we want to control our weight and maintain a healthy, active post-menopausal lifestyle.

This paradigm shift involves a different approach to both diet (Note: I did not say dieting!) and exercise. No magic pharma pill or painless regimen. Still, we can regain control of the bathroom scales despite the slings and arrows of our slowing metabolism and estrogen-storing fat cells. And honestly, we might end up with better health habits than we ever had before. 

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