Q: Will I ever orgasm?

You may be among the 4 percent who won't experience orgasm--who, for some reason, simply can't, under any circumstances. It's more likely that you're among the 96 percent who can. When a woman tells me she's not sure if she's experienced orgasm, I say she probably hasn't; it's fairly obvious when it happens.

Most women need direct clitoral stimulation to reach orgasm; what we see so often in movies, of partners climaxing together through intercourse alone, is rare in real life. Beyond that, there's plenty of variation: Some women may need an hour of clitoral stimulation; others may experience orgasm through brief nipple stimulation.

I recommend that each woman know her own clitoris, because degrees and types of pleasurable stimulation vary among us. Vibrators are very effective in stimulating the clitoris, and spending time yourself, exploring in a relaxed environment, will help you advise your partner on what feels good. Soothing or arousing music or a sexy scene from a movie can help, too.

When you're ready to go further, you can try internal stimulation, which leads to orgasm for about 30 percent of us. A vibrator like the Gigi2 can be used both externally and internally, so you can place it in the vagina (use a lubricant to be sure you're comfortable) and see what happens.

While chances are good (about 96 percent good!), there's no guarantee of orgasm. And because being focused only on orgasm can actually inhibit your ability to experience it, I hope you'll enjoy the intimacy and other sensations along the way!

Q: How can I increase sensation and more readily orgasm?

There is no doubt that the ability to achieve an orgasm becomes more difficult as we age, and the orgasm itself is often briefer and less intense. As we age, we need more time for every step of the process, starting with foreplay. Sometimes our partners need to hear a clear message about what's changing for us! We hope our website can make it easier to have those discussions with a partner.

Using a warming lube, like Oceanus G Stimulating or Sliquid Organics Stimulating O Gel, can improve sensation for some women. Warming lubes include a minty or peppery ingredient, which increases circulation and sensation in genital tissues.

You mention occasional orgasm success with a vibrator. Not all vibrators are alike: Some don't provide the intensity of vibration that our tissues need in midlife. We offer vibrators by Emotional Bliss that are more powerful than average, designed for those who specifically need more stimulation, more intensity. I’ve seen some amazing results with these in women who previously were unable to have an orgasm because of neurologic diseases or medications that are known to interfere with orgasm.

You might also talk to your health care provider to see whether vaginal (or localized) estrogen is a good option for you. Lack of estrogen to vaginal tissues results in a decrease in circulation, which leads to less sensation, which is why you may not sense penetration as you did before.

Do talk to your partner and explore your options. Sexual satisfaction comes in many forms, but if you're missing orgasms, there's no reason to leave them behind.

Her First Vibrator (Pt 3)

Part 3 of 3
Shopping for vibrators can be fun, and really very interesting. These devices come in many configurations and with many options, because, well, we’re all different. What one woman or couple likes and needs can be a real turnoff for the next.

While my partners and I shopped for the collection we offer at our online store, we kept these factors in mind:

Size and Shape Vibrators come in sizes and shapes destined for specific as well as general use. You will find mini vibrators great for clitoral and prostate stimulation. These small devices may fit in the palm of your hand or strap to a finger (especially good for making love in the dark).

There are larger clitoral vibrators shaped to cup the clitoris and labia. These can be combined with a dilator or dildo, used during intercourse, or used on their own to help stimulate vulvo-vaginal tissues.

Midsized vibrators are often wand-shaped for vaginal and g-spot stimulation. Large women find these useful for the reach they provide, and they can also provide leverage for women who have difficulty with hand strength.

Massagers are dual use devices, used for vulvar stimulation as well as massaging muscles anywhere in the body (really!). Attachments for these devices can transform them into vaginal and g-spot stimulating wonders.

Power Older women generally need more power, both a stronger vibration and a longer session time. For that reason, rechargable batteries or plug-in devices are usually a better bet than disposable battery-operated devices.

Materials Hard plastics and stainless steel are easy to clean. Look for materials that are guaranteed to be phthalate-free. Silicone surfaces are wonderfully warm to the touch, with a skin-like feel. They clean up with soap and water or with cleaners made especially for sex aids, but owners need to be careful not to use them with silicone-based lubricants. Some manufacturers now use anti-microbial plastics, medical-grade materials formulated to discourage bacterial growth.

Heat Feature Vibrators that warm up before and during use are great for those of us who flinch from the cold.

If that’s too many variables to maneuver in one shopping experience, may we make a recommendation? If this is your first vibrator ever, why not start with one designed specifically for clitoral and labial stimulation? That way you’re sure to have a device that will help you improve circulation, keeping your vulvar tissues responsive and ready for sex when you are.

When you have your new device in hand, be sure to charge it fully before you use it. Start slowly and gently, using plenty of lubricant with the device, learning what your device will do and how your body likes it. If it’s been awhile since you have had any sexual stimulation at all, be patient. Give your body time and a number of sessions to awake to this new sensation. And if you’re bringing this new toy into an old relationship, talk through it, explore this device together. The more communication, the better.

And you tell us! What advice or questions or stories do you have about selecting a vibrator or bringing one into your sex life for the first time? We would love to hear from you!

Return to Pt 1 of 3

Her First Vibrator (Pt 1)

Part 1 of 3
“A Vibrator? Me? At my age?!”
That’s a pretty common response when I recommend — actually prescribe — using a vibrator to the patients I see in my menopause practice. I live in a small city in the middle of the Midwest, where sex aids are of course in use — as they are everywhere and for millenia — but they are hard to find and almost never openly discussed, at least not among the generation hitting menopause right now.

Vibrators for sensation and satisfaction

But, yes, Virginia, a vibrator, for you, and especially now. Here’s why… As we approach menopause, our sex hormones are in a constant state of flux. Perhaps flooding our systems one minute, depleted the next. What they are, especially, is unreliable. They are just not reliably there when you need them to do their work in bringing you to arousal, helping to lubricate your vagina, to make sex possible, much less pleasurable.

Then, once we have fully reached menopause, our hormones are more predictable, but they’re in shorter supply. That might not bring any measurable sexual changes for one woman, but for another, it can feel like a door has been shut in her face. Her vaginal tissues may not respond to the same sexual stimulation that always worked in the past. That can leave some of us feeling as if we have just stopped functioning, sexually.

Of course, the whole point of this blog and our website is to share the news that it ain’t over until you say it’s over. The secret to keeping sex alive after menopause is MORE. Follow our recipe: More knowledge, more lubrication, more stimulation, more intimacy, more exercise.

What came without trying when we were young — reading the small print, responding to sexual stimuli — now requires assistive devices. Reading glasses… and a vibrator. (And moisturizers, maybe dilators, a sexy movie or two, a pillow?…)

But especially vibrators. And not just any vibrator, but a vibrator with more power and endurance than a young girl needs. Clitoral stimulation at our age needs to overcome the sluggish circulation in a clitoris that, if unused, will go dormant, pulling up into the body. Our vibrators need more power, over a longer period, to replace that circulation and encourage a clitoris to come out to play.

On to Part 2 of 3...